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Best Dog Car Crates for 2020

If you have ever been to a certain flatpack furniture store and tried to get everything home in your car, you may have realised that the boot can’t really hold large, cubic objects which weren’t designed around its shape. Cue a boot door which won’t shut.

This makes fitting a conventional metal dog training crate into this space quite a challenge, too. A dedicated dog car crate is slanted, so the door is able to shut without you having to compromise on space.

While most are metal, there are fabric variations too which have their own benefits. To see our overall pick of the best dog car crates, read our reviews below.

We’ve also written about soft dog crates here, and our guide to the best dog crates can be found here.

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    Our Top Picks

    Image Product Details
    COZY PET Car Dog Cage
    • Double opening
    • Spacious
    Check Price
    A R North America Inc Variocage Single Crash Tested Dog Cage
    • Adjustable size
    • Safety openings in case of crash
    Check Price
    Ellie-Bo Deluxe Sloping Puppy Cage
    • Non-chew features
    • Heavy duty door latch
    Check Price

    Top 10 Best Dog Car Boot Crates Reviewed

    1.
    COZY PET Car Dog Cage

    A large dog crate is needed for breeds such as Collies, Labradors, Vizslas and Dalmatians, and if you have a generously sized boot.

    The slanted front should allow you to shut your boot safely, and it should be short enough so you can still see out of your rearview mirror.

    We love how the cage has a double opening, too. This safety feature will allow you to access the dog from inside the car after the seats have been folded down if you can’t exit the car, or if the boot won’t open.

    Smaller sizes are also available, again with double doors and perfect shapes.

    Features

    • Double opening
    • Spacious

    Specifications

    • Dimensions: 92.5 x 81 x 69cm
    • Weight: 9.2kg

    2.
    A R North America Inc Variocage Single Crash Tested Dog Cage

    The Variocage Crash Tested Car Crate is an innovative range of dog crates which have been tested in crash and roll-over situations. In fact, it is the only one on the market which passed Front, Rear and Roll-Over Crash Tests.

    They include a crumple zone. This range includes single and double doors, as well as dog crates designed for hatchbacks and also for the smaller dog. Each cage is size adjustable so you can get it just right to a point, as well.

    In the case of an accident, a trapped dog can be released via the unique escape hatch so you can ensure they are safe and don’t have to remain within the car for longer than needed. The locking doors with Gas Hydraulic Motion Springs will keep your pet secure when they’re in the cage, so they can’t work their way out and end up as a distraction.

    Each cage is equipped with rubber carpet for comfort, quietness, and ease of cleaning in case of any accidents or muddy paws.

    Features

    • Adjustable size
    • Safety openings in case of crash

    Specifications

    • Dimensions: 99 x 55.5 x 59 cm
    • Weight: 17kg

    3.
    Trixie 3930 Transport Cage

    With a removable divider included, this would be a good crate for two dogs or for a puppy who will eventually grow into the full size.

    Galvanised wire is strong, and you get a removable tray which will capture any accidents and can also be padded out with bedding.

    When it isn’t in use, the whole thing is collapsible, so you can remove it and store it in the garage or hallway when you’re off to do the weekly food shop.

    You can pick from six size choices, making it the best dog car crate for dimension options, but the upper size is by far the biggest we found. The only downside is that the larger options don’t have a slanted side, so you will also need to have a big car.

    Features

    • Divider optional
    • Strong build

    Specifications

    • Dimensions: 6 Choices
    • Weight: Varies

    4.
    A R North America Inc Variocage Double Crash Tested Dog Cage

    Transporting two dogs in one crate can be hard enough, but minimising the risk of injury if there is a crash can be even harder.

    This is the infamous Variocage but now made with two sections, so both dogs are safe from crashes and from the impact affecting each other. The emergency escape hatch at the rear will come in handy if you suffer a bump from the back, as the back seats can be taken forward and the dogs still released.

    There’s a built-in key lock for extra safety, so any dogs which have mastered the old bar slider door lock will not be able to demonstrate their skills on this. It has passed the stringent crash test safety standards established by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, so don’t just take our word for how safe it is!

    Features

    • Plenty of space for two dogs
    • Impossible for dogs to get out of

    Specifications

    • Dimensions: 103 x 93 x 65 cm
    • Weight: 34kg

    5.
    Ellie-Bo Deluxe Sloping Puppy Cage

    Puppies can be hard to transport. They are generally quite adventurous and excitable, and their smaller size means they can easily be injured if in a large crate.

    This small 24” crate is good for puppies or smaller breeds. It is slanted to accommodate the shape of most boot doors, and the extra thick bars are resistant to any chewing. The metal tray and fleece lining are also removable and non-chew.

    It can fold flat for when not in use, and a carry handle will make it a bit easier to get in and out. The door is secure, and just the perfect size to ensure they can’t escape when you open it, but you can still see to them and get them in and out comfortably.

    Features

    • Non-chew features
    • Heavy duty door latch

    Specifications

    • Dimensions: 24”, 30”
    • Weight: 7.52kg

    6.
    doghealth Double Sloping Dog Car Cage

    A double crate is ideal if you will be transporting two dogs. The divider ensures each has their own space, which is not just important for their own peace and quiet but also to minimise injury if one is more active than the other.

    Three doors mean each half has its own opening so you aren’t overwhelmed when getting them out of the car, and the top access door will allow you to check on them from the inside of the car – perfect if you’re at a standstill on the motorway and can’t get out to open the boot.

    The divider is removable, so it can be treated as one larger crate too. Bear in mind that it is quite narrow, so the two dogs may only be able to sit up as opposed to lying down if they’re medium-sized. This could restrict its use to short journeys.

    Features

    • Double doors
    • Optional divider

    Specifications

    • Dimensions: 79 x 53.2 x 12.6 cm
    • Weight: 9.4kg

    7.
    Petsfit Indoor Dog House Soft Fabric Dog Crate

    A soft dog crate is mostly used indoors, or to carry an animal around as opposed to in a car or boot. But they can actually be the most appropriate option for some dogs and situations.

    Metal wiring is open, which lets your dog see out of the window and around them, but this can be a bad thing if they get car sick or like closed small spaces to prevent nerves or anxiety. A fabric option should reduce motion sickness while being a bit cosier.

    Two doors, as well as a top opening, give you plenty of access options. The mesh windows offer a good amount of ventilation so they feel comfortable, and a soft pad in the base will keep them cosy but is also removable and washable.

    A choice of three size options means you should be able to find your perfect fit, and it is lightweight in case you need to take it in and out of the car.

    Features

    • Double doors
    • Optional divider

    Specifications

    • Dimensions: 79 x 53.2 x 12.6 cm
    • Weight: 9.4kg

    8.
    Easipet Sloping Travel Crate

    A basic crate, but something which still does the job for smaller pets.

    There is one door and a removable tray, which you can fill with soft furnishings or keep as it is if your dog is prone to accidents. It is plastic, which is a bit flimsy but on a positive note is easy to wash and keep clean.

    It is suitable for most hatchback cars, with a sloped end and overall space-saving design. Best for small dogs, you may need to bulk up the base tray with blankets and cushioning if you have a very small dog or puppy who is prone to moving around a lot.

    Features

    • Easy to keep clean

    Specifications

    • Dimensions: 61 x 46.5 x 50cm
    • Weight: 6kg

    9.
    Ferplast Atlas Car Dog Carrier 100

    When you would prefer a carrier-style crate as opposed to a big metal cage, this option is ideal.

    It has been specially designed to fit into the boot of most cars, so is a better option than your traditional carrier. The plastic-coated metal door is sturdy, and we loved the fact that it slides as opposed to opening outwards, which will really help if you need to grab your dog before opening the boot fully.

    There are handles on the sides, and large ventilation holes will keep it airy. The otherwise solid plastic sides will be good for anyone who needs to restrict their dog’s visibility due to motion sickness or overexcitability.

    You get two really handy storage compartments on the top of the crate for any bits and bobs, such as brushes, treats and their lead. A draining hygienic pad is included, which keeps it all clean.

    There are three size choices, so you can select the one which is best for your dog. The largest size also has the option to divide it into two sections.

    Features

    • Top can be removed from the base for cleaning
    • Sliding doors

    Specifications

    • Dimensions: 3 Choices
    • Weight: 7kg

    10.
    Hardcastle Folding Metal Car Boot Pet Dog Cage

    A slanted design ideal for people carriers and 4x4s, this cage is taller than a lot of other versions out there.

    Twin front doors allow you to split the cage into two sections, or the separator can be taken out for one extra-large cage. The metal base tray is removable and easier to clean, and a lot sturdier and secure than most of the plastic versions out there.

    It isn’t the most slanted of designs, so if you have a hatchback you could struggle with fitting it perfectly. The metal tray can also become a little worn and is slippery so you will have to ensure it is secured.

    Features

    • Strong build

    Specifications

    • Dimensions: 93.2 x 67.1 x 10.4cm
    • Weight: 11.6kg

    Buying Guide

    Car Boot Size

    A cage which just about fits into a Range Rover will not squeeze into a Ford Ka.

    It is important to measure the width of your boot, taking into account any bits which stick out or aren’t entirely flat. You should also measure the space between the door and back seat, and take into account whether the shape and slant of your boot door will have an effect on the shape of the crate you can buy.

    Crates can also be placed onto a back seat and fastened using seat belts or straps, but do remember that there is a good chance your seats aren’t entirely flat and this could cause a bit of wobbling.

    Dog Size

    It is all well and good getting a crate which fits perfectly in your car boot, but you need to ensure your dog can then comfortably fit into the said crate.

    The height of the crate should at least go up to their neck, so they can lie down comfortably. While most other items need to be quite roomy, you shouldn’t give your dog too much vertical space as they could jump up, get thrown around or fall over when you’re driving due to sudden movements.

    The width should match their length when they’re lying down. This will encourage them to do this, so they are safe.

    If you’re buying for a puppy but don’t want to have to buy another model in a few months when they have grown, try a crate with a divider. This way, you can restrict space but increase it when the time is ready, without having to buy a whole new crate.

    Alternatives

    If your car is small, your dog is too large, or you don’t like the idea of them being in the boot, you may wish to opt for an alternative method of getting them round.

    Car seatbelt clips or harnesses are the best way to transport your dog if you want them to sit in the front seat or on the back seat, without any restrictions or cages. You can also purchase boot guards which close off the open part between the boot and back seat, so they can’t jump over the seats but have the maximum amount of space possible in the boot.

    Of course, this can mean that they aren’t as secure when it comes to things like emergency braking, or if they’re generally restless, so a cage would be good for any dogs who move around a lot.

    Crate Door

    Most crates are designed so you can open the door and the dog can jump straight out, or so you have enough space to see to them when they’re still in the cage.

    Ensure that the open boot door will still allow the door of the crate to open fully so they can jump in and out.

    Material

    The majority of dog crates are metal wire. Your dog can see out, they’re easy to keep clean and they are the most secure option so your dog’s movement is restricted.

    There is the option of a soft material crate, too. These could be good for any dogs who get car sick so you need to restrict their movement and visibility, or if you will need to use a crate at the chosen destination and don’t want to carry a bulky metal cage around.

    Soft crates can also be good for boots which are odd shapes, or if you want something which can be used on the car seats and adapt to shapes. Bear in mind they’re harder to look after and clean should the dog have any accidents, however.

    Double Openings

    Most cages will have a door which will open once your car boot is open. But many also have a second door, which is either at the top of the cage or rear.

    If you were unable to open the boot for some reason, such as a car accident or parking restrictions, you will still be able to access your dog by folding down the back car seats or reaching over. This could be worth thinking about.

    Other Buyers Ask...

    Why Do I Need A Car Crate?

    According to the Highway Code, you need to ensure all animals are suitably constrained so they can’t distract you while you are driving, or injure anyone in the car.

    There are no rules on how exactly this is done, however. A car boot crate is good if your car is otherwise full of passengers, or if you know your dog will be restless or do all they can to distract you. You should not have to take your eyes off the road to check up on them.

    Can I Fasten It To My Boot?

    A big question is how to secure your crate to the boot. This could be a good idea if your boot is larger than the crate and you know your car journey involves some bends and traffic as opposed to a flat, smooth motorway.

    A few bungee cables or something similar could help it to attach to any Isofix points in the boot, or around car headrests. You may also wish to pad out the rest of the free space with cushions, bags or something similar so the cage can’t move.

    My Dog Gets Car Sick – Can Crates Help?

    A car crate will restrict the amount which your dog can move around, said to reduce the likelihood of motion sickness.

    A crate which has solid, closed sides can also help reduce visibility which is said to help travel sickness, but open crates can also be covered with a blanket or towel.